For More Information, Please Call Us: 774-314-3114

Communicate Better with a Loved One Who Has Alzheimer’s

Communicate Better with a Loved One Who Has Alzheimer’s

Can you recall if when was the last time that you were able to hold an actual conversation with your elderly parent or grandparent? You probably miss talking to them, don’t you?

If you find that their condition has been impeding communication between both of you, don’t lose hope just yet. There are certain strategies you can employ that will help facilitate a successful exchange of ideas between your senior loved one and you. Donna Kay Rest Home has put together a couple of suggestions that might be of great help to your case:

  • Free them from any preconceived assumptions

    Don’t assume the worst right off of the bat. It’s true that this condition may indeed be limited in so many ways, but you also have to make note of the fact that Alzheimer’s disease does not always present with the same set of symptoms. What you may have observed in other patients who have a similar diagnosis might not affect your elderly parent or grandparent in the same way.

    So, it’s okay to keep a little faith that things will go your way, eventually. Having a positive mindset when visiting a rest home in Worcester, Massachusetts will allow you to foster a better experience not just for the person you care for, but for yourself as well.

  • Include them in conversations

    A sense of belonging is an important factor in communication. After all, you probably also wouldn’t be interested in engaging a conversation if other people are just talking over your thoughts, right?.

    A sense of belonging is an important factor in communication. After all, you probably also wouldn’t be interested in engaging a conversation if other people are just talking over your thoughts, right?

  • Give them eye contact

    Seeing your loved one not being at the best of their health can sometimes be painful to look at. Still, that shouldn’t stop you from maintaining eye contact.

    These little gestures of communication go a long way indeed. For one, maintaining eye contact can be interpreted as a sign of sincerity and trust. And to your elderly parent, it can mean so much. Put this technique to the test the next time you visit your loved one and see what happens.

  • Allow them time to make a response

    We’re all familiar with how Alzheimer’s disease can harrow an individual’s cognitive function. And at times, it can also affect the way they are able to receive, process, and interpret a message.

If your senior parent takes a minute to come up with a reply, be patient. It may not seem like it, but just like you, they, too, are trying their hardest to reach out to you.

What did you think of the topic of this blog? Did you find it helpful for your situation? Share your insights in the reply box below.

This entry was posted in Senior Care and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

seniors smiling